I was surprised to hear a friend refer to Source Code as a movie I would like.  The previews didn’t look like anything special, but as my friend told me more about it, I decided I would check it out.

One of the big things that made me go see this movie was hearing it was from the same director as Moon, that moody little sci-fi movie with Sam Rockwell acting against a robot voiced by Kevin Spacey.

Source Code is not that movie, and that’s a good thing.  Everything about Source Code points to a different mentality, the notion of civic duty, saving lives, and living within a society.  In a lot of ways, Source Code is the anti-Moon.

There is no hesitation, as the movie starts by establishing the train that half of the movie will take place on.  Jake Gyllenhaal awakes, is disoriented, and clashes with the name the young woman sitting nearby calls him.  Eight minutes later, the train explodes and our main character is in a dark cockpit being coached by Vera Farmiga.  It turns out Gyllenhaal is being asked to play the part of a passenger on this train in an attempt to stop the bomber’s next attack.

I don’t want to give away any details, much like Duncan Jones’ first film,  Moon.  I think there’s a great deal of depth and character in this movie.  Jeffrey Wright is great as the mysterious scientist in charge of the operation.  As Wright’s character is revealed, Farmiga’s character becomes a greater stabilizing force for fellow soldier Gyllenhaal.  I was pleased with how much character there was in each character, even in the random people on the train.

There’s a lot I could say, but Source Code is one of those movies you want to just watch.  Don’t listen to details about it, don’t think about it, just watch.  You’ll enjoy it.

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