On my days off, I’ve been reading The Shadow Of What Was Lost by James Islington. Though I’m not finished with it, I’m enjoying the book tremendously. I’ll likely get the second book when it’s released later this year.

Last week, I came upon the following passage:

c_qnz7iuwaasxrr

Of note is the end of the first scene and how it matches with the second. Both scenes are from the perspective of deuteragonist Wirr.

He didn’t move for a long time.

***

It was an hour later when Wirr returned.

This is the only point in this book where I’ve had to stop and think, “Why did you write it that way?”

However, that was only my initial thought. As the first scene deals with an extreme sadness on Wirr’s part, his stillness before the scene break is tied to his grief. The emotion of that moment is so strong that Wirr loses his perspective of time until he returns in the second scene.

The only reason this stands out is because both sections are aligned close to each other. That implication is the only note of the dissonance Wirr feels with his tears.

It’s a subtlety that’s interesting to think about.

Advertisements