Category: Books


 

On my days off, I’ve been reading The Shadow Of What Was Lost by James Islington. Though I’m not finished with it, I’m enjoying the book tremendously. I’ll likely get the second book when it’s released later this year.

Last week, I came upon the following passage:

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A Pair Of Invitations

This is me promoting myself. Or building my platform. Pick any buzzword you like.

Truthfully, I’ve been doing things with YouTube that I enjoy. Do these things help me establish myself as a writer? Critical thinker? I’ll leave that answer up to you.

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What is the purpose of science fiction? In many respects, it is a commentary on our society, who we are, and where we could be going?

I discussed some of these things in my last post, but I feel this is worth discussing further. For the record, this isn’t something that’s happened since Donald Trump was elected President of the United States.

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Setting A Fire Upon The Deep

If you’re after a review of the Vernor Vinge modern classic A Fire Upon The Deep, you are in the wrong place. Yet I’m about to talk about that book a lot.

For those of you not familiar with the 1993 co-winner of the Hugo Award for Best Novel, here’s an Amazon link. It’s solidly worth a read.

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New Release: In The Shadow Of War

My friend Bradley R. Mitzelfelt has just released the first novel of THE DARK MAGE CHRONICLES, In The Shadow of War. As another emerging writer like myself, I wanted to share this release with everyone.

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You’re thinking Why might this book be for me? I shall gladly answer that.

  • It stands on the tradition of Mass Effect. Lead character Dearic Thyne is an Ardour, something of a fantasy equivalent of a Spectre with an extra dash of detective thrown in. While there are bandits, thieves, and orcs running around, there are also the insect-like Nalgvane and a mystery species called the Mists. It’s a wide world where the standard rules don’t have to apply all the time.
  • Dearic is suppose to be a perfect character and fails at it. When I asked Bradley to describe Dearic to me, he said this: “Dearic is the quintessential good guy. He’s chivalrous, likes beautiful women, is highly intelligent, and likes to fight with a rapier.” He makes enemies, he doesn’t know the full capability of his weapons, and, when he has a purpose, he’s utterly single-minded.
  • “Who am I?” Dearic doesn’t know where he comes from, as he’s the King’s adopted son. Despite that major pull on his loyalty, he still has to find out where he came from, then determine how much his nurture or nature will shape his future.

If you’re ready for In The Shadow Of War, it’s ready for you now.

ANNOUNCING: A Day Of Thanks

The key to happiness, I’ve heard, comes from gratitude. Given some of the promotional shenanigans I’ve seen others do, I thought it would be a good idea to have an event based around gratitude.

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The Role of History

Recently, I’ve been reading DB Jackson’s Dead Man’s Reach, the latest entry in The Thieftaker Chronicles. Since the series is set in pre-Revolutionary Boston, history isn’t just an impacting force on the story, it drives the setting and immediate events. The latest entry is no different since it includes many of the events leading to the Boston Massacre.

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An Author’s Name

Five years ago, I went to a Dragon Con panel featuring David B. Coe. Upon introducing himself, mentioned that having a pseudonym wasn’t as bad as most writers might fear it could be. I was instantly curious about what he was referring to, since it had to be connected to an upcoming project.

Before another year had passed, The Thieftaker Chronicles had begun. The series is listed under the author D.B. Jackson, which is the pseudonym David uses for his historical urban fantasy. As I learned more about the first novel, Thieftaker, I kept thinking, “Wow, what a great idea for a story!” For me, that turned out to be a doorway to reading more books.

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Speed of Reading

I wrote recently about how fast some of my friends can read. I’m jealous of them and their speed reading.

This post isn’t about that.

I’ve noticed that some books read at different rates than others. I’m going to highlight a few choice examples, just to illustrate this further. Continue reading

To Live After Death

My Dad always said he wanted a “Cajun Funeral” when he died–a party full of laughter, food, and good memories, not a cloud of tears.  In all honesty, we did our best.

As writers, most of those who know us would not be able to attend such a gathering, no matter the mood.  Readers mourn in similar ways as friends and family, but without a way to directly show their appreciation and love.

With the recent passing of Terry Pratchett, I’d like to share what I do as a reader to mark the passing of an author of note.

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