Tag Archive: Frank Herbert


Yes, we are all tired of this awful election season. We have all seen some of the worst mud-slinging that’s come about in–possibly–generations. So, God in Heaven, why would I want to talk more about politics?

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Inspired by a recent post by my friend, Shen Hart, I’ve decided to start looking at some of the key elements that defined my creative mindset.  First up, Dune.

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The Right Pace

Anyone who tells you that writing is as simple as connecting the dots, is either lying to you or not giving you all the information.  There are things that must be considered.  Not every story can be told the same way and so, a balance has to be struck.

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What Makes a Villain?

A few nights ago, business was slow and I ended up having a lengthy discussion with my store manager about villains.  Not simple bad guys or characters who are shades of gray–villains.  He and I discussed movies, but, being a writer, I thought it would be much more interesting to turn that question toward books.

So, I ask, Who are your top five villains from books? Continue reading

Picking the Next Book

Reading is something all writers have to aspire to.  The more writers read, the more they’ll understand about how the publishing game has worked in the past, what structures work, what plots do nothing.  Reading gives writers the audience perspective, something that’s of great importance when starting or editing any project.

For someone with as varied tastes as myself, it’s not easy picking out what to read.  Unlike many people, I’ll stop reading a book if it doesn’t appeal to me or if I’m just not in the mood.  A great example of this is Mike Carey’s Felix Castor books; every time I try to read The Devil You Know, I find myself in the wrong mood and unable to get out of the first chapter.  That doesn’t mean I won’t read it, that just means I’ve been trying to read it at the wrong times. Continue reading

The Voice

I’ve heard a writer’s voice is one of the most important things about their craft.  You always know when you’ve read on of Neil Gaiman’s metaphors.  You know when the text is phonetic and southern, it’s Mark Twain.  If you see a lot of second person or exceptional detail describing hand-to-hand combat, it has to be Greg Rucka.  Should you be reading prose that paints a setting out of emotions as well as visuals, you have to be reading Guy Gavriel Kay.

So, I ask myself, what voice makes my prose distinct? Continue reading